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Showing posts from October, 2015

UI Design for Processing Modals

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Dialogs, Light boxes, and Modals whatever you call them are a common interface used in websites. When I started out I constantly had to write code to handle multiple situations. After writing a few I started to list a few behaviors I think should happen in/after a modal close. Without going to deep in an explanation I really just wanted to come up with a good way to include offline mode in my applications.
Rules Not all of them but just some examples, the image is a better example. Every action must give imitate feedback to the user (results can be async). I.E. "Buy" will convert to "Processing" Information should be logged and stored for users to retrieve it. Applications Types of applications these I thought of. Ecommerce quick way to buy Settings in a Dashboard Post back or User session stored variables. Social Media Log ins When attaching or connecting to main site account. Pretty much any modal that modifies back-end data.

Flavors vs.Themes for CSS Libraries

Colors aside there's a lot more happening in css themes that one needs to develop or maintain. So I've asked myself countless times if I should just create my own Css library but time was always against me. I think having bootstrap as a base line is a good starting point. Not only for my sake but non front-end developers. As a front-end developer organization with my teams is critical. Every application sooner or later ends up with too many developers doing their “own thing” especially with the styles if there is not standard or company brand. Don't get me wrong the freedom can sometimes be great for a creative projects. However when looking to creating a brand, my applications need to force some rules. I'm not looking to challenge other developers on their approach to new things or change the way they develop. If I can include them in my work flow and at the same time organize them then I will.     So what I'm leading up to is this idea flavors instead of theme…

Avoid Mixing Server Side and Client Side Code

Some Background      This article is from a time when I used primarily Asp.net 4 with razor syntax which was a love and hate relationship. I started out as a front-end developer but was limited by my peers on the technologies I could use as well as my skills. Even though I was peer reviewed much of my code was "acceptable" I however felt it lacked something.
Currently      I avoid mixing MT (middle-tier) and FE (front-end) code; it goes in hand with my philosophy on how to design web applications. I strongly recommend going the extra mile. Ask yourself how will others use the code; not how will they reuse it, that's another concern. Also how will you debug it if something goes wrong? There are many reasons why I avoid doing this. Mainly cause I like to take the approach of SOC (separation of concerns).After years of frustration trying to debug finally I made this rule for myself. Not only with my code but in my process of thought during developing. Which was be a big task a…

A Good Structure can say a lot

So one of the things you got to love about developing Asp.net applications is the default folder structure. As a nou can easily pick up on the concepts and figure how to organize yourself. When starting out an unity3d project not so muc (in opinion). I look at the new Asp.net 6 as a perfect an example, ita not simple but labeled out and can teach you new concepts. Maybe is just me since I write more web apps than games. Whatever the case may be I've learned is its not easy to pickup on new concepts if the structure isn't there by example.
   So a little bit of my experience and not to down play unity3d cause it is pretty simple to get. What I see as a constant problem is organization and structure. Which the two go in hand when developing. Whenever I use plugins and import other's code its doffocult to get back so some kind of structure. Everyone does it differently but it can get really annoying if you have a folder structure and you want to force it across your im…